The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

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FRAJD

The Frajd family was not poor but not rich either. They lived in Kowalska Street, then they moved to Bernardyńska Street. Their flat had three rooms: a living room, one for Jochewed and Regina and one for their parents. Jochewed described it as modest, but warm. They furnished it in dark colours, wooden things. Her mother liked porcelain dishes very much and she kept a few services of these. When Jochewed visited Lublin some time ago, she went to Kowalska Street to look for the apartment she lived in – there was nothing left. But in Bernardyńska Street she knocked on the door and a Polish woman opened. My grandma asked kindly if she could come in and see her apartment. She discovered her desk, her bed and she said that the corridor, along with the stairs to the apartment, didn’t change at all – they were just the same! - Shani Brosh.

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KREMPEL

The family in Lublin was a big family. Some of them were rabbis. But my grandfather Baruch Krempel rebelled against this. He lived a Jewish life, but not an Orthodox life – my father didn't have a bar mitzvah. My family lived outside of the Jewish district. They lived here in Grodzka, in Kościuszki and in Szpitalna Street, which doesn't exist anymore in the same place – the new Szpitalna is not the same as the old one. They were very modern Jewish people for that time. Baruch Krempel had a factory. His children were left in the care of a Christian nanny.

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GOLDBERG

The name of the family was Goldberg. I saw many pictures of my grandparents and they looked like everybody else in the street. You wouldn’t find any difference. They were not a religious family, they didn’t go to synagogue every Shabbat, but they celebrated all of the Jewish holidays like Yom Kippur, Rosh HaShanah, Pesach.

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AIZEN


My grandparents – Aizen, lived in 28 Krakowskie Przedmieście Street. They did quite well. My grandmother Sara, was very talented in tailoring and she had a hat salon, which was called “Saloma”. She had 12 workers and was a designer there. My grandmother was married to a man who didn’t want to study in the yeshiva. He wanted to be his own man. He studied craftsmanship in Warsaw. My grandfather met my grandmother when she came to visit one of her brothers who was a very wealthy merchant in Warsaw. They settled in Lublin and had a family here with two daughters: the younger was Hanna – Ancia, and the older was Judith – Justyna, who was my mother. They were practical people, a little bit assimilated into Polish culture. They were not religious. They were very elegant people, they appreciated good fashion, nice furniture.

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MITELMAN (family of Salomon Aliza, née Edelman)

In Israel my aunt Rozalia, who was from Lublin, used to cook rosół, gefiltefish, kasza gryczana, krupnik. I remember the real krupnik with chicken wings – this was the taste of home. She prepared galareta. I didn’t like it, but gefiltefish, galareta and rosół were the taste of Poland. There would be kreplach and naleśniki. My aunt would always make them. - Aliza Salomon

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FRAJD (family of Shani Brosh)

They lived in Kowalska Street, then they moved to Bernardyńska Street. Jochewed's apartment in Kowalska Street, was on the corner with Furmańska. She said that Kowalska Street was like a big commercial centre with lots of bakeries, leather and shoe stores, it was quite like a market. She lived on the first floor, she had the corner window and usually sat in the window fascinated, looking at all the crowds in the street.

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HALBERSZTADT (rodzina Brigitte Waks)

The Halbersztadt family was one of the most known families from Lublin. They lived at 38 Lubartowska Street (now 44), which was bought in 1904 by Jakub Icek Halbersztadt and Lea Rachla (nee Erlich). Meir, Aron Hersz, Szama Halbersztadt and Chaim Luzer Waks, who married Szyfra Halbersztadt, lived there.

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LEWINSOHN (rodzina Josiego Dakara)

The Lewinsohn Family was an upper middle class family. They lived at Lubartowska street in Lublin and were Zionists. Josef Benjamin Lewinsohn was the owner of “Bengal” chemical factory and candle factory.

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SZPIC

SZPIC

Hersz Szpic and Estera Wajsfisz married in 1910 in the synagogue in Ryki. They lived in a tenement house at 16 Grodzka Street in Lublin, near the Lublin branch of the Wajsfisz family living in a tenement at Grodzka 7. They had three daughters: Serka, Szajndla and Anka and son Szmul.

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