The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre in Lublin is a local government cultural institution. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre in Lublin is a local government cultural institution. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

Władysław Panas (1947–2005) ENGLISH VERSION

Władysław Panas (1947–2005) ENGLISH VERSION

City is a book, it can also be that city is a poem – professor Panas was the first to treat a particular city that way. Thanks to this he became the discoverer of magical Lublin and its multiculturality. He was also an writers of Jewish origin works interpreter. He gave inspiring lectures, wrote numerous articles and books which put works by Brunon Schulz in new light.

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Collection of glass plate negatives from the house at Rynek 4

Given the scale of destruction visited on the Jewish town and the entire Lublin, it might seem that no meaningful traces of life in the pre-war Polish-Jewish city can be found any more. However, after many years, from a dark hiding place arranged in the attic of a house in Lublin, there emerge the faces of the city’s inhabitants photographed on glass plate negatives before the outbreak of the war. It is because of these faces, captured in sharp focus, that the photographs are so powerful.

Tomasz Pietrasiewicz
 

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The Orphanage at 11 Grodzka Street

The Orphanage at 11 Grodzka Street

The Nursery for Orphans and the Elderly was established in 1862 by the Jewish Community with the purpose of caring for orphans in need and elderly people. It was situated in the Old Town at 11 Grodzka Street. The institution operated under this address until 24 March 1942, when German forces brought it to a close with the mass murder of both child and elderly residents.

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Chewra Nosim Synagogue on 10, Lubartowska Street in Lublin

Chewra Nosim Synagogue on 10, Lubartowska Street in Lublin

The only preserved pre-war synagogue in Lublin is the Chewra Nosim synagogue. It is located in the 19th century apartment house no. 10 on Lubartowska Street. In 1987 Symcha Wajs’ initiative led to Izba Pamięci Żydów Lubelskich (Hall of Remembrance of the Lublin Jews) being established here. Nowadays, it is home to the Lublin branch of Towarzystwo Społeczno-Kulturalne Żydów w Polsce (TSKŻ - Social and Cultural Fellowship of Jews in Poland).

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Witold Dąbrowski (1961)

Witold Dąbrowski (1961)

Witek Dąbrowski—one of the founding members of Brama Grodzka–Teatr NN—has served as the Deputy Director of the institution since 1998. Witek was born in Łaskarzew, a small town100 kilometers from Lublin and has lived in Lublin since the 1980. He considers Lublin his home.

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Tomasz Pietrasiewicz (1955)

Tomasz Pietrasiewicz (1955)

Tomasz Pietrasiewicz is the founder and the director of The Grodzka Gate–NN Theatre Centre in Lublin (Ośrodek "Brama Grodzka - Teatr NN"), an actor with the Grupa Chwilowa Theatre and the director  of the NN Theatre.  He is the creator of the exhibition in the Grodzka Gate, as well as initiatives in the city space. He was an opposition activist during the communist period in Poland.  Pietrasiewicz is the author of numerous books and  recipient of many awards and distinctions.

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Majdanek – German concentration camp in Lublin

Creation of the Majdanek camp was connected to the plans of germanization of eastern Europe. According to them Majdanek was supposed to be a source of workforce. It was designed for people of various nationalities but the most numerous group of inmates were Jews. Majdanek camp was very different from the camps in Bełżec and Sobibór.

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Anna Langfus (1920–1966) – ENGLISH VERSION

Anna Langfus (1920–1966) – ENGLISH VERSION

(January 2nd, 1920 – May 12th, 1966)

She was a novelist and a playwright, author of texts on the Shoah and the tragedy of those who survived. She was one of the first to mention these issues in literature. After the war, she lived in Paris, where she gained recognition as an author writing in French. Her works have been translated into several languages. In 1962, she received the most important French literary award, Prix Goncourt, for her novel "Les bagages de sable" ("The Lost Shore").
 
In Poland, Anna Langfus's works were almost unknown. In February 2008, thanks to publisher Prószyński, the first Polish edition of Anna Langfus's book appeared in bookstores – "Skazana na życie" ("Le sel et le soufre" – "The Whole Land Brimstone"), translated by Hanna Abramowicz. This work, which is the author's debut in prose, is an autobiographical report from the times of the German occupation in the form of literary fiction. The book came out in France in 1960. In 1961, it was awarded the Swiss Charles Veillon Prize (for the best novel in French).
 
More than forty years after Anna Langfus's death, the "Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre" Centre, where for several years we had been working on discovering the biography and works of this outstanding Lublin citizen, came up with the idea of publishing her novel. We were supported in these attempts by Jean-Yves Potel, a French writer and university lecturer, former cultural counsellor in the French Embassy in Warsaw. Material presented here is  the effect of research we carried out together. 

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Joseph Dakar (Józef Zakrojczyk) – English version

Joseph Dakar (Józef Zakrojczyk) – English version

Joseph Dakar was born as Józef Zakrojczyk on 27 May 1948 in Wałbrzych. When he was a two-year-old child, he moved with his mother to Israel. He has finished law in the Jerusalem University. He has been working as a lawyer in Israel. In 2000 he started to be involved in the affairs of the Lublin Community in Israel and in the years 2003–2017 he was the chairman of the Lublin Jewish Organization in Israel.

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Lublin Jewish Organisation in Israel

Lublin Jewish Organisation in Israel

Lublin Jewish Organization brings together people of Jewish origin with family connections with Lublin, including the second and third generation, children and grandchildren of Lubliners. The organization is based in Israel in Tel-Aviv.

 

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Ghetto in Podzamcze – the displacement action

Ghetto in Podzamcze – the displacement action

On the 16th of March 1942 the German security forces commenced with the liquidation of the ghetto in the Podzamcze District of Lublin, simultaneously undertaking a programme of genocide which, in the months to come, was designed to embrace the entire General Government (GG) and was aimed at nothing less than the biological extermination of the Jewish population, coupled with the plunder of Jewish property. It was part of “the Final Solution to the Jewish Question” formulated by the Third Reich.

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The Ghetto in Podzamcze – boundaries and area

The Ghetto in Podzamcze – boundaries and area

The first months of 1941 brought a tightening of German policy regarding Jews in the whole General Government territory. The advancing process of ghettoization in that period had claimed many towns and cities, among them Kraków, Radom, Częstochowa and Kielce. It was a period when the city of Lublin also witnessed the creation of its own ghetto. The small number of Jews who could reside outside its boundaries were those in possession of special permits or dispatched to working places. The privileged few included city hall and the Judenrat clerks, doctors, as well as chosen craftsmen who did specific jobs commissioned by the Germans. In the months to come, the living conditions of the majority of Jewish citizens deteriorated significantly, leading to the outbreak of typhoid fever and resulting in an increased death toll. Many of the ghetto inhabitants lived on the verge of utter desitution while the Judenrat, facing constantly diminishing money and food supplies, could not help prevent the intensifying pauperization. Despite the dramatically severe conditions, the Lublin Jews were not left dying in the streets, as was the case in the Warsaw ghetto. The situation had not improved, however, until the beginning of 1942, when the ghetto was divided.

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The Displacement of the Jewish Inhabitants of German-Occupied Lublin Before the Creation of the Ghetto

The Displacement of the Jewish Inhabitants of German-Occupied Lublin Before the Creation of the Ghetto

The functioning of the Jewish district in Podzamcze during the German occupation can be divided into four periods. The first one commenced with the German invasion of Lublin and lasted until March 1941. The second period was marked with the decree issued by the Lublin District Governor Ernst Zörner, which regulated the establishment of the ghetto. The third period started at the turn of 1941 and 1942, with the German division of the ghetto into sections A and B. On the night of 16th/17th March 1942, the final phase of the functioning of the ghetto began, which concluded in mid April with a complete liquidation of the Jewish District in Podzamcze. 

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Operation „Reinhard” in Lublin

Operation „Reinhard” in Lublin

Operation "Reinhard" was one of the most horrifying events in the history of mankind. There was no single institution which would plan and control the action. The whole Nazi administration was involved in the process. Its each element was necessary for the operation. Good workflow organization allowed the Nazis to eliminate 2 million Jews in 1.5 year. They were murdered in "death factories" in a large-scale, "industrial" process. During Operation "Reinhard", no less than 700 thousand Jews were killed.

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"Kol Lublin" - the annual magazine of Lubliners in Israel

"Kol Lublin" - the annual magazine of Lubliners in Israel

"Kol Lublin" ("Voice of Lublin") is the annual magazine of Jews with Lublin roots in Israel and of the diaspora. It is the main forum for communication amongst our community. Fifty years have passed since the first annual was published. We believe that the variety of subjects, the abundance of data, and the richness of expression in "Kol Lublin" form a complement to the “Encyclopedia of the Jewish Diaspora: Lublin”, the pre-eminent publication containing information about the Jewish community in Lublin.

Text by: Neta Żytomirska-Avidar

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Józef Czechowicz (1903–1939). ENGLISH VERSION

Józef Czechowicz (1903–1939). ENGLISH VERSION

Czechowicz was born, created his works and died in Lublin. His tragic death is reminded by the statue of the poet in Plac Czechowicza. The poet is seen as a nostalgic and catastrophic writer, nevertheless, he was also the leader of Lublin avantgarde and bohemia. The author of Poemat o mieście Lublinie (A Poem about Lublin) was a modern poet, whose works had strong influence on the next generations. So far, his output in the fields of drama, journalism, translation, photography and pedagogy has remained unnoticed. Czechowicz – regionalist has also been forgotten. Above all, this underestimated mistifier, genius and visioner, who lived a short but fascinating life, left – despite his early death – a very rich collection of works.

The "Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre" Centre organises events to commemorate Józef Czechowicz’s birth and death, every year there is also a public reading of Poemat o mieście Lublinie (A Poem about Lublin) combined with a walk around the places described in it. Special papers contributed to the poet’s work are issued here as well.

 

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The Flugplatz labour camp

The work camp established in the area of the pre-war Lublin airport, under the corresponding name of Flugplatz, was one of the biggest work camps in the Lublin District. It operated between 1942 and 1943. Prisoners held there included mainly Jewish women and men from various countries, as well as a group of Polish women. During Operation Reinhard it served the function of a selection square for the arriving human transports. It was also used for sorting and storing goods taken from Jews in the death camps of Bełżec, Sobibór and Treblinka.

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