In May 2014, the "Grodzka Gate - NN Theatre" Centre began the implementation of the "Wooden Treasure. Preserving Heritage Design Future" project. The project has been centred on documenting and promoting the traditional wooden architecture of small towns in the Lublin region.

In May 2014, the "Grodzka Gate - NN Theatre" Centre began the implementation of the "Wooden Treasure. Preserving Heritage Design Future" project. The project has been centred on documenting and promoting the traditional wooden architecture of small towns in the Lublin region.

NN Theatre

Krasnobród

Krasnobród was established in 1576 as a craft village, most likely by Andrzej Firlej. Later the town was the property of the Leszczyński, Lipski and Zamoyski families. In 1585 Calvinists had their own congregation here and soon the town became an important Protestant centre. In 1648 Krasnobrów was devastated by Cossacks who took part in the Khmelnytsky Uprising, then once more by Tatars in the latter half of the 17th century. After supposed religious visions that occurred in 1640 and the founding of a church in 1690 by Maria Kazimiera Sobieska, the town became an important destination of pilgrimages. The residents of Krasnobród were largely Catholic and Jewish. The first Orthodox church was built in 1750. Krasnobród lost its town charter and city rights in 1870. At the end of the 19th century it became famous throughout Europe as one of the first sanatoria to treat tuberculosis.

The urban setting of Krasnobród consists of three parts: the old manor complex (Podzamek), the monastery complex (Podklasztor) and the town itself. The town centre consisted of a square. It was surrounded by arcade houses with front-facing ridges, and the arcades were supposed by five columns. The square had several multi-story buildings, and many houses had attics that served as living quarters. Most of the buildings had jerkin head roofs, with protruding eaves. Houses whose attics served as living spaces were covered with gable roofs. Krasnobród was characterised by the diversity of its buildings' front elevations were erected in many slightly different styles. The wooden architecture of Krasnobród was nearly completely destroyed in the two world wars. After the destruction that came in World War I, the houses surrounding the town square were rebuilt, keeping their styles close to traditional with only minor changes: the houses became predominantly covered with gable roofs, with balconies at their lowest parts. In 1935 the wooden houses of Krasnobród were photographed by Janusz Świeży. In September 1939 the town burnt down during the fights that took place nearby. Currently the Krasnobród town square has no preserved traditional wooden buildings.

Examples of the wooden architecture of Krasnobród include: the Water Chapel, located where the religious visions of the Holiest Virgin Mary were supposedly experienced by Jakub Ruszczyk; the St Antoni of Padova chapel dating back to the 19th century; the St Mikołaj and St Anna chapel dating back to the 19th century; and the St Roch chapel, located in the St Roch forest reservation at Zagórze, approximately 2,5km from Krasnobród. 

 

Krasnobród – 3D model

 

Krasnobród, domy podcieniowe
Krasnobród, domy podcieniowe

 

Iconography

Archive photos of Krasnobród

 

Modern photos of Krasnobród

 

All photography compiled in the Digital Library