The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

NN Theatre

Idea

To understand the activity of the “Grodzka Gate-NN Theatre” Centre it is necessary to know the history of its seat - Grodzka Gate. The Grodzka Gate is one of the oldest gates in Lublin, also known as the Jewish Gate. At one side of the Gate, there is a huge empty space concealing the memory of the Jewish town that once existed here. Where there used to be houses, synagogues and streets, there is a huge parking area, lawns and new roads. A considerable part of this area has been covered with concrete. Together with the foundations of the old Jewish buildings, the memory of those who once lived here was buried.

We, who since 1992 have been the hosts of this place, had known nothing about it before. The encounter with the Gate and its history has changed our lives. We started collecting photographs of that town, recording memories of those who remembered it, searching the archives. Over the years, the Gate has become the Ark of Memory. Inside it, you can now see and hear a story about a non-existent Jewish town.

Jews who come here ask us “Why do you do this? After all, you are not Jewish. You are Poles and the Jewish town is not your history”. Poles ask us “Why do you do this? After all, you are Poles and the Jewish town is not our history. Or maybe you are Jewish?” We explain patiently that it is our common, Polish-Jewish history. To remember the murdered Jews you do not have to be Jewish. In the world we live in, we need much more of such gates. Not only between Poles and Jews.