The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre in Lublin is a local government cultural institution. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre in Lublin is a local government cultural institution. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

NN Theatre

Maps documenting the spatial development of Lublin

Lublin in the 16th centuryDirect link for this paragraph

In the 16th century Lublin received the royal approval necessary for the construction of a city pipeline, a waxwork factory, paper factory, and several other avenues of industry.

The Lublin Castle, located on Castle Hill, saw an expansion in the 1520s. The castle itself occupied a larger area than it does today: it was a collection of buildings of both a representative and economic character. Aside from the royal quarters, these were towers, gates, a chapel, as well as stables, a well and servants’ quarters.

The rise where the Old Town area is currently located was surrounded by city walls dating back to the 14th century, which were renovated several times. This area was the centre of Lublin, with a population of c. 5000. The main building in the area was the town hall, currently the Crown Tribunal, located in the centre of the market square. It was surrounded by other brick and stone buildings.

 

Lublin in the 18th centuryDirect link for this paragraph

The Lublin Caste was destroyed during the Swedish invasion of Poland, and some of the infrastructure supposedly also fell into disrepair due to the underground passages being built in the Podzamcze area. In the 18th century, local authorities have made sure that the remaining intact buildings would be protected. These were the vicarage, chapel and one remaining tower. Smaller buildings were erected in the northwest corner of the courtyard for the purpose of housing the chancellery and archive.

The mediaeval city walls lost their defensive capabilities and beginning in the 18th century they were being slowly dismantled, or integrated into the spread of newer architecture.

After 1791 Lublin was divided into two administrative circuits. The first included most of the centre of the city that had previously been walled. The area was densely populated, home to mostly brick and stone buildings and palatial noble houses. The remaining areas were part of the second circuit. Altogether the city was spread across an area of approximately 21km2 and slowly continued to expand.

 

Lublin in the 19th centuryDirect link for this paragraph

The city has undergone major renovations after the great fire of 1803. This change took place between 1815 and 1830. New thoroughfares were paved, and several squared were established in the city centre. At that time the “heart” of the city organically migrated towards the Krakowskie Przedmieście area, moving away from the castle area. Renovations on a smaller scale were taking place throughout the 19th century.

In 1870 the population of Lublin was nearing 21 400.

At the start of the century, the city occupied an area of 10,1km2. By the end of the century it was 8,7km2.

 

Lublin in the 20th centuryDirect link for this paragraph

1st half of the 20th centuryDirect link for this paragraph

Between 1916 and 1939, several villages and administrative divisions were added to Lublin’s city limits.

After Poland gained independence in 1918 the Castle functioned as a jail.

In 1939 the population of Lublin was 122 000. 32,5% of the people living in the city were Jewish.

 

2nd half of the 20th centuryDirect link for this paragraph

During World War 2, 663 buildings were completely destroyed, two districts were almost entirely demolished, 60% of streets and 70% of pavements were rendered unusable, and bridges threatened collapse.

Immediately after the war, the site of the Nazi concentration camp Majdanek was turned into a museum commemorating the atrocities that had transpired during the Holocaust.

Following the war several of Lublin’s universities were established: Marie Curie Skłodowska University (1944), the Lublin University of Technology (1953), the Higher School of Agriculture (1956, currently the University of Life Sciences), and the Medical Academy of Lublin (1950, currently the Medical University of Lublin).

In December 1970 Lublin had a population of almost 236 000. In 1974 the city was spread over a total of 118,4km2.

 

Lublin in the 21st centuryDirect link for this paragraph

Currently Lublin occupies a total area of 147,5km2 and its borders were last adjusted in 1989. Since 2007 it has been divided into 27 administrative districts.

At the end of 2006 the city had a total population of 340 466.