The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

The well at the Lublin bus station

The well at the Lublin bus station

Suction lift  pumps with wooden pipes were being installed in wells in Lublin already since 1826, and in 1841 engineer of the province, Feliks Bieczyński began to endeavour to replace them with lift-and-force pumps with iron pipes. Count Andrzej Zamoyski’s Machines Factory in Warsaw, that by 1863 had installed three of such devices in municipal wells, accepted the commission. Pumps were meant to be equipped with flywheels and cranks.

After operation tests, the project was accepted for implementation: In the catholic city, where each of 8 wells is about 160 ft deep, suction lift pumps with flywheel and pump casing will be installed, whereas in the Jewish city, where all 4 wells are shallow - lift-and-force pumps are to be fitted.

Zamoyski’s factory also offered a standard design of the pump housing. In the city files from 1809-1874 period such design is kept, submitted by the factory in 1864, when the company was assembling the well on the market square, near the Świętoduska St. and Nowa St. (part of today’s Lubartowska St.) junction.

 

 

Read more

Lublin Castle

Existence of a medieval gród (a wooden fortified settlement typical for Slavonic nations) named Lublin at the turn of the 12th century was proved, among others, by the discovery of remnants of the city’s former fortifications. It is not known precisely, since when had the wooden settlement been existing. It might have developed around a wooden watchtower, constructed on nowadays’ castle hill  - as tradition has it - already in the times of Bolesław I Chrobry’s reign. It is possible that a brick church was located within the 12th-century settlement.

Read more

Lublin archcathedral

The archcathedral of St. John the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist, a former Jesuit church in Lublin.

The church was consecrated in 1604. It is one of the first baroque buildings erected outside Italy. In the second half of the 18th century, after the Society of Jesus had been cassated, the church fell into disrepair. Restoration works were carried out in the first half of the 19th century. In 1823, the church was elevated to a cathedral.

Read more

The Grodzka Gate in Lublin

The Grodzka Gate, often called The Jewish Gate, is one of first stone-built elements of the city's fortifications built in 1342 after the permission of king Kazimierz the Great. At the end of the 18th century, the object was rebuilt. This task was commissioned to Dominik Merlini. For centuries The Grodzka Gate was also called The Jewish Gate, as it was a passage between the Old Town and the Jewish district.

 

Read more

Chewra Nosim Synagogue on 10, Lubartowska Street in Lublin

The only preserved pre-war synagogue in Lublin is the Chewra Nosim synagogue. It is located in the 19th century apartment house no. 10 on Lubartowska Street. In 1987 Symcha Wajs’ initiative led to Izba Pamięci Żydów Lubelskich (Hall of Remembrance of the Lublin Jews) being established here. Nowadays, it is home to the Lublin branch of Towarzystwo Społeczno-Kulturalne Żydów w Polsce (TSKŻ - Social and Cultural Fellowship of Jews in Poland).

Read more

Holy Trinity Chapel in Lublin

The Holy Trinity Chapel, adjacent to the Lublin Castle, is one of the finest examples of Medieval art in Poland. Its Gothic architecture, combined with Byzantine-Ruthenian polychromes, makes up a unique synthesis of Eastern and Western cultures.

Read more

Tower at the Lublin Castle

The tower at the Lublin Castle, also referred to as the donjon, is the sole monument of the Romanesque architecture east of Vistula river. This cylindrical brick building is one of the elements of the Lublin Castle complex.

Read more

Kraków Gate in Lublin

Heading from Krakowskie Przedmieście Street towards the Old Town, one notices the silhouette of the Kraków Gate (Pol. Brama Krakowska) from far away. History of this brick building reaches back to the 14th century. After the minacious Tatar raid of 1341, it was decided that the city would be surrounded with fortified walls and gates. The Kraków Gate, which was named after the route and the suburb towards which it led, is one of those gates.

Read more

Basilica of St. Stanislaus and Dominican monastery in Lublin

The Dominican church and the monastery were erected in the southern part of the Old Town Hill (wzgórze staromiejskie), on a small elevation, the so-called Dominican Hillock (górka dominikańska). The monastery’s history is related to the relics of The True Cross that were kept there until 1991.

Read more

Chapels at the basilica of St. Stanislaus in Lublin

History of the Dominican church and the monastery relates to the relics of the True Cross, kept there for several ages. According to Jan Długosz, they were brought to Lublin in 1333, while another account states that it happened after 1400. New chapels were being constructed at the church one after another in order to store the relics.

Read more