The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

Lublin 1317–1474 ENGLISH VERSION

Until 1317 Lublin had developed into quite an economical centre with trade and crafts in the lead, but it was not until granting of the town privileges that the city begin to flourish. The event which brought its development to a stop for a while was the Tatar invasion in 1341, which left Lublin in a state of a ruin. However, Casimir the Great defeated the Tatars on the right bank of the Bystrzyca river (thus the name of the village and later the district – Tatary).

 

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Lublin under the rule of the first Jagiellonian kings 1434–1474 ENGLISH VERSION

Lublin's development and growth at the turn of 14th and 15th centuries and the with Lithuania and Ruthenia resulted in Lublin becoming one of the most important cities in the Kingdom of Poland. The route connecting the two capitals of Jagiellonian kingdom – Vilnius and Cracow. 15th century seen the Jagiellonian monarchy joining European trade with its three major export goods: grain from Poland, furs from the Lithuanian-Ruthenian lands, and oxen from Ukraine and Volhynia. Other less important goods were wax, linen, wood and the Polish cochineal. Fairs, organised in borderland towns situated next to particularly busy routes, were one of the ways in which the trade functioned at that time. It was especially due to the development of the fairs that Lublin began to flourish economically in the times of the first Jagiellonian rulers on the Polish throne – passed through the town.

 

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