The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

Lublin Renaissance Route – Lublin Region

This distinct consistent architectural style of sacral buildings erected in the Lublin Region in the first half of the 17th century was first recognised in scientific literature by Władysław Tatarkiewicz. The term “Lublin Renaissance” was disseminated in art history in the mid-20th century.

 

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Biłgoraj – the shtetl

The beginnings of Jewish settlement in the Biłgoraj region date back to the 16th century. The Ashkenazi Jews who settled here at that time were primarily engaged in trade and crafts.

 

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Towns of the Lublin Region

Small towns were a characteristic feature of the cultural landscape of the Lublin Region prior to the Second World War. The region’s settlement network consisted of 21 towns and 51 small towns. It was typical for small towns in the Lublin Region to have Orthodox Christians and Uniates living alongside Catholics and Jews, which gave rise to a cultural landscape that was unique on European scale.

The social and spatial phenomenon of small towns with their unique cultural climate ceased to exist as a result of the Second World War. They have only survived in memories, on old drawings and photographs, and in literature. The political and economic transformation in Poland after 1989 has also brought about a faster degradation of small towns. Now may be the last moment to preserve the surviving elements of cultural landscape related to the spatial layout of the particular towns or to specific buildings.

 

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Towns of the Lublin Region – shtetl

A shtetl (Yiddish: small town) was a small, provincial Jewish community in prewar Eastern Europe (Russia, Poland, Lithuania, the eastern part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire), a community with a peculiar social structure and mores.

 

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Frampol – the shtetl

The history of the Jewish community in Frampol begins between the first quarter and the middle of the 18th century. An independent kahal with its own cemetery existed here from 1735 or 1736.

 

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Goraj – the shtetl

It is unknown when the first Jews arrived in Goraj. According to statistical data, 517 Jews lived in Goraj in 1865, accounting for 26.8 percent of the total population of the town.

 

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