The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

Yeshiva (Rabbinical Academy) in Lublin

Yeshiva - Chachmei Lublin Yeshiva (Jeszywas Chachmej Lublin) was a Talmudical (Rabbinical) Academy.
 

The building of yeshiva was designed by Agenor Smoluchowski in 1924. It was adapted to fulfill the role of yeshiva in 1928.

Location

No. 85, Lubartowska Street.
The building is situated near the northern end of Lubartowska St., on its eastern side. It stands on the premises bordered by Lubartowska and Unicka streets. The façade faces the Lubartowska St.

Functions

Talmudical Academy (until 1939)
Medical Academy (1944-2004)
Seat of the Lublin Branch of the Jewish Community in Warsaw (since 2004)

History

The initiative of establishing a talmudical academy in Lublin was conceived during a congress of Orthodox Jews in Vienna. Meir Shapiro was the prime mover of building the yeshiva, raising donations all around the world in order to finance its construction. The parcel was donated by Lublin industrialist, Samuel Eichenbaum. Building was designed by Agenor Smoluchowski in 1924. The design was adopted for a yeshiva in 1928. The foundation stone laying ceremony took place in 1924. The solemn opening ceremony came to pass on 21 June 1930. Meir Shapiro was appointed the first rector. During the Second World War Germans arranged a hospital in the yeshiva building. Autumn of 1945 saw location of the Medical Faculty of Maria Curie-Skłodowska University in the edifice (the faculty was then converted into the Medical Academy).

Timeline

1924 - design of the building made by Agenor Smoluchowski
22 May 1924 - foundation stone laid
21 June 1930 - opening of the Rabbinical Academy
1934 - death of Meir Shapiro
1939-1944 - the building serves as a hospital
1945 - the building is handed over to the medical faculty of Maria Curie-Skłodowska University (turned into the Medical Academy in 1950)
2004 - building is taken over by Jewish Community in Warsaw

Architect

Agenor Smoluchowski

Style

20th century architecture, incorporating Baroque and art deco elements.

Description of the building

The five storey brick building is built on a rectangular plan, upon a raised basement, with accommodations in the attic, covered with a skillion roof.
The main entrance is situated on the axis of the façade, leading directly to the main staircase with three-bay stairway.
The entrance is distinct owing to the balcony supported by four pairs of columns.The façade is fifteen-axis, five storey and symmetrical. Vertical and horizontal divisions of the façade are provided by lesenes and engaged columns in Tuscan order. Art deco ornaments can be seen on the third storey, between the windows.
Coping is shaped in form of an attic. Formerly it bore hebrew inscription of the name of the school. The building underwent numerous rearrangements, which is proven by secondary divisions of the interior.

Interior

The interior is arranged in three-bay manner on every storey. Communication is possible using the main staircase as well as two side staircases. One of them leads to the women’s hall. The two-storey-high lecture hall, once serving as a prayer hall, occupies the better part of the building. Inside, there are galleries running along three sides of the hall, supported by columns with capitals styled to resemble the Corinthian order.

 

 

Text by Joanna Zętar

Translated by Jarosław Kobyłko

Literature on the subject

Akta miasta Lublina, Inspekcja Budowlana, sygn. 2675.

Seidman H., Szlakiem nauki talmudycznej, Warszawa 1934.
Sygowski P. [oprac.], Karta ewidencyjna zabytków,
Archiwum WUOS, Lublin 1991.

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