The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

Nimrod Ariav – ENGLISH VERSION

Nimrod Szalom Ariav (Szulem Cygielman) was born on 24.09.1926 in Lublin.

 

 
The son of Marta, maiden name Wajsbrodt, and Lejb Cygielman. The father’s family is from Lublin (his grandfather lived at Kowalska street), and mother’s family from Bełżyce.

He lived in Lublin at Nowa 17 street. He had a twin-brother Abraham. They both attended Tarbut and started education at the Jewish Gymnasium at Niecała street.

After the outbreak of the Second World War his family left for Bełżyce, where he worked as an assistant at the power station.

In 1942 his father was murdered. Nimrod left for Warsaw, where he lived using “some kind of papers” (he used the name Henryk Górski).

He took part in the actions of the Home Army. In 1943, he persuaded his brother to come to Warsaw. Several months later they were denunciated and his brother was killed. Nimrod changed name to Godlewski. At that time, his mother also lived in hiding in Warsaw. Nimrod took part in the Warsaw Uprising, probably as a member of “Parasol” battalion (as “Henryk”). He fought at Sienna street and in the Old Town, where he was wounded. After the defeat of the Uprising he got to the hospital in Krakow, where he stayed until liberation.

In 1945, he returned to Lublin for a short time. Later, he went to Germany; he studied at the Unra University in Munich. He participated in the illegal transfer of Jews from Germany to Italy. He became the commander of Hagana training camp in France.

In 1948, he went to Israel, where he joined the army (the air force). He spent seven years in the army, and left it as a captain. In the period 1954–1973 he worked at the Israeli aircraft enterprise (Israel Aircraft Industries), and in 1983 he was appointed the President of this enterprise. Later, he established his own aircraft company.

In 1963, Ariav Nimrod came to Poland for the first time after the war. Since 1987 he has come here regularly. Each year he visits Bełżyce, where he found his father’s grave. He organized reconstruction of the devastated Jewish cemetery. He was gradually getting involved in the life of this local community; he provided financial support for the hospital and schools in Bełżyce.

He has a wife (who is French) and two sons.  
 

Materials for Polish website prepared  by:
Tomasz Pietrasiewicz,
Marzena Baum, Tomasz Czajkowski, Marcin Fedorowicz,
Łukasz Kowalski, Karolina Kryczka, Monika Krzykała,
Alicja Magiera, Piotr Sztajdel, Barbara Zarosińska
Translation: Elżbieta Petrajtis O'Neil 

 

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