The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

The “Grodzka Gate – NN Theatre” Centre is a local government cultural institution based in Lublin. It works towards the preservation of cultural heritage and education. Its function is tied to the symbolic and historical meaning of the Centre’s location in the Grodzka Gate, which used to divide Lublin into its respective Christian and Jewish quarters, as well as to Lublin as a meeting place of cultures, traditions and religions.

Part of the Centre are the House of Words and the Lublin Underground Trail.

Henio Żytomirski – The Story of Family

The Żytomirski family – their history.

 
 
A photograph of the Żytomirski family taken in 1936 in Lublin,
after the wedding of Sonia Żytomirska,
in the apartment of Froim and Chaja Żytomirski at 22 Lubartowska Street.

 

 
1. Froim Żytomirski (Henio’s grandfather)
2. Chaja Żytomirska (Henio’s grandmother)
3-4. Lea Łapicka and Gołda Ajzynberg – sisters of Chaja Żytomirska
5. Ycchak Mełamed – brother of Chaja Żytomirska
6. Max Łapicki – Lea’s husband
7. Josef Kornberg – Sonia’s husband (Henio’s uncle)
8. Sonia Kornberg – daughter of Froim and Chaja Żytomirski (Henio’s aunt)
9. Rachela Żytomirska – daughter of Froim and Chaja Żytomirski (Henio’s aunt)
10. Ester Żytomirska – daughter of Froim and Chaja Żytomirski (Henio’s aunt)
11. Sara Żytomirska – wife of Szmuel Żytomirski (Henio’s mother)
12. Szmuel Żytomirski – son of Froim and Chaja Żytomirski (Henio’s father)
13. Leon (Lejbuś, Jehuda) Żytomirski – son of Froim and Chaja Żytomirski (Henio’s uncle)

 

The story of the Żytomirski family known to us begins with Froim Żytomirski (son of Chaim) who was born in 1880 in Międzyborze.He married Chaja (née Mełamed), born in 1881 in Riga. The couple had five children: Szmuel (b. 1900), Sonia (b. 1903), Ester (b. 1910), Leon (b. 1913) and Rachela (b. 1915). All the children were born in Warsaw.

Having moved to Lublin, the family of Froim Żytomirski lived in 22 Lubartowska Street. When the ghetto in Podzamcze had been established, they all moved to a tenement house at 11 Kowalska Street. Froim Żytomirski died of typhoid on 10 November 1941.


Szmuel, the eldest son of Froim and Chaja Żytomirski, was born in 1900. He married Sara, née Oxman. They had the only son Henio, born in 1933. Szmuel Żytomirski lived with his wife and son in 3 Szewska Street. When the ghetto had been established they all moved to 11 Kowalska Street, between March and September 1941. During the occupation, Szmuel Żytomirski worked in a post office in 2 Kowalska Street, and he was also a post officer after his deportation to the ghetto in Majdan Tatarski. Szmuel Żytomirski died in Majdanek concentration camp on 3 November 1943.

The only person from the Żytomirski family who survived Holocaust was Leon (Leybuś, Jehuda) Żytomirski. Leon Żytomirski was born in 1913 in Warsaw, died in 1998 in Israel, where he emigrated in 1937. After he came to Israel, Leon Żytomirski married Chana, née Hochberg, born in 1915 in Warsaw. Leon and Chana Żytomirski had two children: Netta (b. 1943) and Jacob (1947-1973).

The other members of the Żytomirski family perished between 1941 and 1943. There is no exact information about the circumstances of their death.

 

We learn about the fate of the family during the war from the correspondence carried on by Froim Żytomirski. As the direct correspondence was difficult, Froim Żytomirski wrote to his cousin Lena Hechtman, called Mamza, who lived in Brooklyn, through Meir Hochberg, brother of Chana Hochberg (wife of Leon Żytomirski) living in Vilnius, as well as through the Red Cross.

The letters written from 20 December 1939 to 8 October 1941 contain short pieces of information about the family’s health. Each time, Froim Żytomirski asks for passing the information on to his son Leon living in Israel.